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Thread: 2009-2010 Human movement research using MovAlyzeR

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    2009-2010 Human movement research using MovAlyzeR

    2010

    Caligiuri, M.P., Teulings, H.L., Dean, C.E., Niculescu, A.B., Lohr, J.B. (2010).
    Handwriting Movement Kinematics for Quantifying EPS in Patients Treated with Atypical Antipsychotics.
    Psychiatry Research, 177, 77-83.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?Term=20381875
    Results from 59 psychosis patients (age 51+-9) and 46 healthy comparison subjects (age 42+-9) from the University of California San Diego, Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center, and Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis revealed (1) slowing and dysfluency in patients compared to controls, (2) differences across medications, and (3) across daily dose. These findings support the ecological validity of movement analysis as an objective behavioral biomarker for quantifying the effects of antipsychotic medication and dose on the motor system. NIH National Institute of Mental Health R44 MH073192
    Becky Farley, Sara Derosa, Gail Koshland, & Arend Van Gemmert (2010).
    The LSVT® BIG and LOUD training protocol transfers to an untrained handwriting task in early Parkinson disease
    NASPSPA, Tucson, AZ, USA, June 10-12 2010.
    http://www.naspspa.org/conf/2010_Fin...ce_Program.pdf

    2009

    Mohammed L, Found B , Caligiuri MP & Rogers D (2009).
    Pen pressure as a discriminatory feature between genuine and forged signatures.
    In Vinter, A., & Velay, J-L. (Eds). Proceedings of the 14th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2009), 13-16 September 2009, Dijon, France. Dijon: Vidonne Press. ISBN 9-782746-604841. pp 26-29.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=120
    The authenticity of a signature was examined at the San Diego Sheriff’s Crime Laboratory, CA, USA and Document Examination Unit, jointly with Victoria Police Forensic Services Department, and the Handwriting Analysis & Research Laboratory, School of Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia and the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA. Common examinations are based on static signatures limiting the estimation of dynamic information. Pen pressure variation is an integral part of each person’s handwriting behavior. Pen pressure differences between genuine and forged signatures were examined in 33 writers (mean age 39, singatures were text-based (n= 17), mixed (n=9), or stylized (n=4)). The genuine signatures have higher pen pressure than the forgeries. There was greater variability in the pen pressure of the forged signatures in comparison to the genuine signatures supporting that pen pressure can be used as a discriming factor for the authenticity of signatures independently of the forger's own signature style.
    Caligiuri MP, Teulings HL, Dean CE, Niculescu AB, Lohr J. (2009).
    Handwriting movement analyses for monitoring drug-induced motor side effects in schizophrenia patients treated with risperidone.
    Hum Mov Sci. 2009 Oct;28(5):633-42. Epub 2009 Aug 18.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?Term=19692133
    74 participants were tested at the University of California San Diego, Minneapolis Veterans Administration Medical Center, and Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis. 21 risperidone-treated schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (SZ), 6 unmedicated schizophrenia patients (age 45+-11), and 47 normal healthy volunteers participated in this study (age 42+110). Risperidone-treated participants exhibited lower movement velocities during simple loops than unmedicated patients. Movement dysfluency during sentence writing increased with dose. In contrast, we found no association between observer-based rating of Extrapyramidal Symptoms (EPS) and daily dose. These findings support the importance of movement-based measures to monitor EPS in medicated schizophrenia patients. NIH Grant R44 MH073192
    FREE ACCESS: This manuscript NIHMS139909 has been loaded into PubMed Central for public access: http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/article...?artid=2749075

    Saltuklaroglu T, Teulings HL, Robbins M. (2009).
    Differential levels of speech and manual dysfluency in adults who stutter during simultaneous drawing and speaking tasks.
    Hum Mov Sci. 2009 Oct;28(5):643-54. Epub 2008 Nov 4.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/en...ltuklaroglu%22[Author]
    15 adults who stutter (ages 18–51, mean 28) from the University of Tennessee, Speech and Hearing Clinic and a control group of 15 (ages 21–50, mean 32) participated. Frequency of stuttering events in the speaking tasks and measured pen stroke duration and pen stroke dysfluency (normalized jerk) were estimated. Episodes of stuttering showed more dysfluencies with pen movements. Stuttering was virtually eliminated in choral reading (reduced by 97%), but manual dysfluency was reduced by only 47% relative to reading aloud. Episodes of stuttering and motor dysfluency seem related to neural interconnectivity between manual and speech processes. Professional development grant from the University of Tennessee.
    Hughes B, Van Gemmert A & Stelmach G (2009).
    The intermittency of Braille reading finger velocities.
    In Vinter, A., & Velay, J-L. (Eds). Proceedings of the 14th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2009), 13-16 September 2009, Dijon, France. Dijon: Vidonne Press. ISBN 9-782746-604841. pp 190-193.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=120
    16 blind persons (age 43+-15) at Arizona State University and the University of Auckland, New Zealand scanned a Braille text with their fingers. Movements were recorded by a tablet and a pen attached to a finger. The pen movements revealed linguistic Braille-reading effects.
    Gilles Clément, Corinna Lathan, Anna Lockerd, and Angie Bukley (2009).
    Mental representation of spatial cues in microgravity: Writing and drawing tests
    Acta Astronautica, 64 (7), p.678-681, Apr 2009.
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...2&searchtype=a
    9 subjects (age 24–49) were tested both on the ground and on board the CNES Airbus A300 Zero-G airplane performing 30 parabolic flight paths producing episodes of 22 s of microgravity. Motor tests complemented by psychophysics measurements were done by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, UMR 5549 CNRS-UPS Cerveau et Cognition, Toulouse, France, Russ College of Engineering and Technology, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USA, AnthroTronix Inc., Silver Spring, MD, USA. The results indicate that the vertical height of handwritten characters and drawings is reduced in microgravity compared to normal gravity, suggesting that the mental representation of the height of objects and the environment change during short-term microgravity. NASA/ESA
    Harralson, HH, Teulings HL & Farley B (2009).
    Handwriting variability in movement disorder patients and effects of fatigue.
    In Vinter, A., & Velay, J-L. (Eds). Proceedings of the 14th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2009), 13-16 September 2009, Dijon, France. Dijon: Vidonne Press. ISBN 9-782746-604841. pp 103-107.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=120
    9 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (Hoehn & Yahr Stages 1 and 2) and 1 Essential Tremor (ET) patient (mean age 66) and 7 healthy controls (mean age 56) of the University of Arizona, Department of Physiology, Tucson, AZ, USA produced their signature and wrote “George Washington” in cursive (prefatigued condition). Three trials of each task were performed on a pen tablet with inking pen. Participants then wrote a sentence in their normal handwriting, cursive loops, a more complex cursive pattern, and an Archimedes spiral. Then they wrote again "George Washington" and their signature (fatigued condition). The fatigue analysis compares first and last signatures and writing of "George Washington". The visual image analysis showed differences due to fatigue. In the dynamic analysis from the pen tablet recording, the patients were slower and more variable than the controls. Fatigue increases variability in motor-disordered handwriting more severely than in healthy handwriting.

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    1999-2002 Research at Arizona State University

    2002
    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Teulings, H.L., Stelmach, G.E., & Adler, C.H. (2002).
    Adaptation to changes in vertical display gain during handwriting in Parkinson's Disease Patients, Elderly and Young Controls.
    Parkinsonism and Related Disorders, 9, 77-84
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12473396
    This study investigated how PD patients, age-matched elderly and young controls at the Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale and Arizona State University use visual feedback to control handwriting size when manipulating the vertical gain of the handwriting displayed in real time. Key is that a display tablet was used, simulating paper. 5 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (ages 52-72; mean age of 66), 4 elderly controls (ages 65-76; mean 70), and 4 young controls (ages 20-27; mean 23) performed writing patterns. Horizontal and vertical stroke size, stroke duration, and normalized jerk per stroke were calculated. The results showed large effects due to the visual feedback distortion in the young, the elderly, and the PD participants but small differences between the groups. NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke R01 NS 33173, NIA R03 AG19148, RS Flinn Foundation, NIH Research Resources R44-RR11683
    Teulings, H.L., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Stelmach, G.E., and Adler, C.H. (2002).
    Adaptation of Handwriting Size under Distorted Visual Feedback in Patients with Parkinson's Disease and Elderly and Young Controls.
    Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry, 72, 315-324.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11861687

    2001

    Teulings, H.L. (2001).
    Optimization of Movement Duration in Accurate Handwriting Strokes in Different Directions in Young, Elderly, and Parkinsonian Subjects.
    In R.G.J. Meulenbroek and B. Steenbergen (Eds.), Proceedings of the 10th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (pp. 40-45). Nijmegen, The Netherlands. ISBN 90 373 0583 0
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=110
    15 young adults (mean age 33), 9 elderly subjects (mean age 71), and 6 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (mean age 73) wrote at NeuroScript with a non-inking pen on a tablet. The tablet had a transparent plastic cover sheet overlaying a paper showing the home and the 8 target positions of 0.2 cm diameter equally spaced on a circle of radius 2 cm around the home position. The participants produced straight strokes from the home position to one of 8 target positions marked by letters A to H, respectively. The subjects were instructed that after a letter was presented on the computer screen in front of them, they were to lower the pen tip onto the home position and produce a stroke as fast and accurate as possible to the corresponding target position and then to lift the pen. All groups showed submovement optimization: There is an optimal relative size and duration of the primary submovement. The results suggest that Parkinsonians optimize their movements, maybe because their costs of not optimizing would be high. NIH Research Resources R44-RR11683 and National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke R43-NS38793
    Van Gemmert, A.W.A., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (2001).
    Parkinsonian patients reduce their stroke size with increased processing demands.
    Brain and Cognition, 47, 504-512.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11748904
    7 Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients at Arizona State University (ages 58 to 77, mean 69) and 7 elderly control subjects (ages 67 to 80, mean 74) showed that the motor system of PD patients reduces processing demands of the movement by reducing stroke size instead of lengthening stroke duration. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke grant, NS 33173.
    1999

    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Van den Heuvel, C.E., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1999).
    Visuomotor adaptation in smokeless tobacco users.
    Nicotine & Tobacco Research, 1, 219-227.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11072418
    10 smokeless tobacco (ST) users and 11 non-smokers participated in a visuo-motor adaptation test at Arizona State University in which the visual feedback of point-to-point horizontal arm movemenls, displayed in real-time on a computer screen, was rotated by 45° counterclockwise for some trials. Visuo-motor performance between smokers and non-smokers was compared on three occasions, once after at least 8 h of tobacco abstinence (Session I), a second time following ST intake (Session 2), and a third time 45 min arter the original ST intake (Session 3). Both groups performed the three conditions during each session: baseline (normal visual feedback), rotated visual feedback (450 visual feedback rotation), and post-adaptation (normal visual feedback immediately following feedback rotation). Compared with non-smokers, ST users had significantly larger normalized jerk scores (a measure of movement unsmoothness) after ST intake during the adaptation and post-adaptation conditions in Sessions 2 and 3, but not during the baseline conditions, implying a differential effect of ST use specific to rotated visual feedback. Movement duration was also longer for smokers than for non-smokers arter ST intake, but only in the post-adaptation condition. Overall the resulls suggest that ST use, and hence nicotine, has a detrimental effect on visuo-motor performance, particularly on movement smoothness. Smokeless Tobacco Research Council No. 0675
    Van Gemmert, A.W.A., Teulings, H.L., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Stelmach, G.E. (1999).
    Parkinson's disease and the control of size and speed in handwriting.
    Neuropsychologia, 37, 685-694.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10390030
    13 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (ages 57 to 82, mean 68) and 15 healthy elderly individuals (ages 52 to 82, mean 69) at Arizona State University performed loop patterns on a pen tablet. The PD patients were unable to double their stroke size when instructed. NIH National Institute of Neurological Disease and Stroke R01 NS 33173.
    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Vargas-Villamil, F., Teulings, H.L., and Stelmach, G.E. (1999).
    The effect of smokeless tobacco in joint coordination.
    Proceedings of the 9th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (pp. 47-52). Singapore: Nanyang Technological University.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=121
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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    1989-1994 University of Nijmegen, University of Wisconsin

    1994

    Van Galen, G.P., Teulings, H.L., & Sanders, J. (1994).
    On the interdependence of motor programming and feedback processing in handwriting.
    In C. Faure, P. Keuss, G. Lorette, A. Vinter (Eds.), Advances in handwriting and drawing: A multidisciplinary approach (pp. 403-419). Paris: Europia.

    Teulings, H.L. (1994). Invariant handwriting features useful in cursive
    script recognition. In S. Impedovo (Ed.), Fundamentals of handwriting
    recognition (pp. 178-189). Berlin: Springer.

    1993

    Abbink, G.H., Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1993). Description of
    on-line script using Hollerbach's generation model. Pre-Proceedings of the
    Third International Workshop on Frontiers in Handwriting Recognition (IWFHR
    III) (pp. 217-224). Buffalo, NY: Cedar.

    Stelmach, G.E. & Teulings, H.L. (1993).
    Signal-to-noise ratio of handwriting size, force, and time: Cues to early markers of Parkinson's disease?
    Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Handwriting and Drawing (pp. 273-275). Paris: Telecom 93 S 001.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=123

    Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1993). Invariant properties between
    stroke features in handwriting. Acta Psychologica, 82, 69-88.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8475777

    1992

    Schomaker, L.R.B., & Teulings, H.L. (1992). Stroke- versus character-based
    recognition of on-line, connected cursive script. In S. Impedovo and J.C.
    Simon (Eds.), From pixels to features III: Frontiers in handwriting
    recognition (pp. 313-325). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1992).
    Unsupervised learning of prototype allographs in cursive-script recognition using invariant handwriting features.
    In S. Impedovo and J.C. Simon (Eds.), From pixels to features III: Frontiers in handwriting recognition (pp. 61-74). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1992). Simulation of impairment of force
    amplitude and force timing in Parkinsonian handwriting. In G.E. Stelmach &
    J. Requin, (Eds.), Tutorials in motor behavior II (pp. 425-442).
    Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    Hageman, A., Hulstijn, W., Teulings, H.L., Horstink, M. (1992).
    Disorders of simple movements in Parkinson's Disease.

    1991

    Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1991). Control of stroke size, peak
    acceleration, and stroke duration in Parkinsonian handwriting. Human
    Movement Science, 10, 315-333.

    Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1991). Force amplitude and stroke
    duration in Parkinsonian handwriting. In J. Requin, & G.E. Stelmach
    (Eds.), Tutorials in motor neuroscience (pp. 149-160). Dordrecht: Kluwer.

    Schomaker, L.R.B., & Teulings, H.L. (1991). Stroke- versus character-based
    recognition of on-line, connected cursive script. 2nd International Workshop
    on Frontiers in Handwriting Recognition (pp. 265-277). Bonas, France,
    September 24-27, 1991.

    Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1991). Unsupervised learning of
    prototype allographs in cursive-script recognition using invariant
    handwriting features. 2nd International Workshop on Frontiers in Handwriting
    Recognition (pp. 45-55). Bonas, France, September 24-27, 1991.

    Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1991).
    Simulation of impairment of force amplitude and force duration in Parkinsonian Handwriting.
    In G.E. Stelmach (Ed.), Proceedings of the 5th Handwriting Conference of the IGS. Motor control of handwriting (p. 116). Tempe AZ: Arizona State University.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=112

    Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1991).
    Invariant properties of handwriting motor programs to be employed in automatic cursive-script recognition.
    In G.E. Stelmach (Ed.), Proceedings of the 5th Handwriting Conference of the IGS. Motor control of handwriting (pp. 21-23). Tempe AZ: Arizona State University.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=112

    1990

    Burton, A.W., Pick, H.L., Holmes, C., & Teulings, H.L. (1990).
    The independence of horizontal and vertical dimensions in handwriting with and without vision.
    Acta Psychologica, 75, 201-212.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2288231

    Schomaker, L.R.B., & Teulings, H.L. (1990). A handwriting recognition
    system based on properties of the human motor system. In C.Y. Suen (Ed.),
    Frontiers in handwriting recognition (pp. 195-209). Montreal: CENPARMI.
    ISBN: 1-895193-00-1.

    Teulings, H.L., Schomaker, L.R.B., Gerritsen, J., Drexler, H., & Albers, M.
    (1990). An on-line handwriting-recognition system based on unreliable
    modules. In R. Plamondon, & C.G. Leedham (Eds.), Computer processing of
    handwriting (pp. 167-185). Singapore: World Scientific.

    1989

    Schomaker, L.R.B., Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1989). A
    computational model of cursive handwriting. In R. Plamondon, C.Y. Suen, &
    M. Simner (Eds.), Computer recognition and human production of handwriting
    (pp. 153-177). Singapore: World Scientific.

    Teulings, H.L., Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Maarse, F.J. (1989). A description
    of handwriting in terms of main axes. In R. Plamondon, C.Y. Suen, & M.
    Simner (Eds.), Computer recognition and human production of handwriting (pp.
    193-211). Singapore: World Scientific.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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    1979-1988 University of Nijmegen

    1988

    Maarse, F.J., Schomaker, L.R.B., & Teulings, H.L. (1988). Automatic
    identification of writers. In G. Mulder & G. van der Veer (Eds.),
    Human-computer interaction: Psychonomic aspects (pp. 353-360). Berlin:
    Springer.

    Teulings, H.L., Schomaker, L.R.B., & Maarse, F.J. (1988). Automatic
    handwriting recognition and the keyboardless personal computer. In F.J.
    Maarse, L.J.M. Mulder, W.P.B. Sjouw, & A.E. Akkerman (Eds.), Computers in
    psychology: Methods, instrumentation, and psychodiagnostics (pp. 62-66).
    Amsterdam: Swets & Zeitlinger.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., Teulings, H.L., & Schomaker, L.R.B. (1988). Real-time
    processing of cursive writing and sketched graphics. In G. Mulder & G. van
    der Veer (Eds.), Human-computer interaction: Psychonomic aspects (pp.
    334-352). Berlin: Springer.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., Teulings, H.L., Schomaker, L.R.B., Morasso, P., &
    Kennedy, J. (1988). Towards the implementation of cursive-script
    understanding in an online handwriting-recognition system. In Commission of
    the European Communities: D.G. XIII (Ed.), ESPRIT '88: Putting the
    technology to use. Part 1 (pp. 628-639). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    1987

    Maarse, F.J., Meulenbroek, R.G.J., Teulings, H.L., & Thomassen, A.J.W.M.
    (1987). Computational measures for ballistic handwriting. In R. Plamondon,
    C.Y. Suen, J.G. Deschenes, & G. Poulin (Eds.), Proceedings of the 3rd
    International Symposium on Handwriting and Computer Applications (pp.
    16-18). Montreal: Ecole Polytechnique (ISBN 2-553-00197-5).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=125

    Stelmach, G.E., & Teulings, H.L. (1987).
    Temporal and spatial characteristics in repetitive movement.
    International Journal of Neuroscience, 35, 51-58.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3623819

    Teulings, H.L., Schomaker, L.R.B., Morasso, P., & Thomassen, A.J.W.M.
    (1987). Handwriting-analysis system. In R. Plamondon, C.Y. Suen, J.G.
    Deschenes, & G. Poulin (Eds.), Proceedings of the 3rd International
    Symposium on Handwriting and Computer Applications (pp. 181-183). Montreal:
    Ecole Polytechnique (ISBN 2-553-00197-5).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=125

    1986

    Teulings, H.L., Mullins, P.A., & Stelmach, G.E. (1986). The elementary
    units of programming in handwriting. In H.S.R. Kao, G.P. Van Galen, & R.
    Hoosain (Eds.), Graphonomics: Contemporary research in handwriting (pp.
    21-32). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    Teulings, H.L., Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Van Galen, G.P. (1986). Invariants
    in handwriting: The information contained in a motor program. In H.S.R.
    Kao, G.P. Van Galen, & R. Hoosain (Eds.), Graphonomics: Contemporary
    research in handwriting (pp. 305-315). Amsterdam: North-Holland.

    1985

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1985). Time, size, and shape in
    handwriting: Exploring spatio-temporal relationships at different levels. In
    J.A. Michon & J.B. Jackson (Eds.), Time, mind, and behavior (pp. 253-263).
    Heidelberg: Springer.

    1984

    Stelmach, G.E., Mullins, P.A., & Teulings, H.L. (1984).
    Motor programming and temporal patterns in handwriting.
    In J. Gibbon & L. Allan (Eds.), Timing and Time Perception, 423 (pp. 144-157).
    New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6588780

    Teulings, H.L., & Maarse, F.J. (1984). Digital recording and processing of
    handwriting movements. Human Movement Science, 3, 193-217.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1984). The development of
    directional preference in writing movements. In W.B Barbe, V.H. Lucas, &
    T.M. Wasylyk (Eds.), Handwriting: Basic skills for effective communication
    (pp. 367-376). Columbus, Ohio: Zaner-Bloser.

    1983

    Pick, H.L., Jr., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). Geometric transformations of
    handwriting as a function of instruction and feedback. Acta Psychologica,
    54, 327-340.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6666655

    Soevik, N., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). Real-time feedback of handwriting in a
    teaching program. Acta Psychologica, 54, 285-291.

    Stelmach, G.E., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). Response characteristics of
    prepared and restructured handwriting. Acta Psychologica, 54, 51-67.

    Teulings, H.L., Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Van Galen, G.P. (1983). Preparation
    of partly precued handwriting movements: The size of movement units in
    writing. Acta Psychologica, 54, 165-177.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). Constancy in stationary and
    progressive handwriting. Acta Psychologica, 54, 179-196.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). The development of
    handwriting. In M. Martlew (Ed.), The psychology of written language:
    Developmental and educational perspectives (pp. 179-213). New York: Wiley.

    Van Galen, G.P., & Teulings, H.L. (1983). The independent monitoring of
    form and scale parameters in handwriting. Acta Psychologica, 54, 9-22.

    Calis, G.J.J., Teulings, H.L., & Keuss, P.J.P. (1983).
    In search of writing and reading habits in the microgenetic phase of letter recognition.
    Acta Psychologica, 54, 313-326.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6666654

    1982

    Soevik, N., Arntzen, O., & Teulings, H.L. (1982). Interactions among covert
    process parameters in handwriting motion and related graphic production.
    Journal of Human Movement Studies, 8, 103-122.

    1979

    Teulings, H.L., & Thomassen, A.J.W.M. (1979). Computer-aided analysis of
    handwriting movements. Visible Language, 13, 218-231.

    Thomassen, A.J.W.M., & Teulings, H.L. (1979). The development of
    directional preference in writing movements. Visible Language, 13, 299-313.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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    2003-2005 Early research using Movalyzer

    2005

    Teulings H.-L., Teulings H., Romero D. H. and Subramanian R. (2005).
    Handwriting Teaching Tool for Children
    Proceedings of the 12th Biennial Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (pp 95-99) (IGS2005), 26-29 June 2005, Salerno, Italy. Civitella, Italy: Editrice Zona. ISBN 88-89702-13-3. pp 95-98.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=116
    16 classroom students in Grades 3-8 (age 9-14) from a small, private school were divided into 3 groups. The experimental and control groups practiced cursive handwriting on the computer-based system for 10-15 minutes twice a week for 7 weeks, in addition to the usual handwriting classroom instruction. The non-feedback control group followed normal handwriting instruction without the computer-based system. The computer-based instruction system showed a writing pattern replayed in slow motion. The student wrote this pattern on a pen tablet using a non-inking pen while receiving real-time feedback on the screen. The child’s writing was replayed with a color coding highlighting dysfluencies (experimental group) or with vertical velocity (little related to fluency). A cumulative quality score was shown indicating whether the trial was "better" than the previous trial. We collected weekly a sample of their journal-book writing. Independent experts tried to guess the sequence the weekly handwriting samples were produced. NIH National Institute of Child Health and Human Development R43 HD43576
    Lawler, Elisabeth N. , Jul 2005
    Preparation Modulation in Timing of Speech-Movement Sequences
    Thesis (M.A.) -- School of Psychology Georgia Institute of Technology
    http://etd.gatech.edu/theses/availab...00508_mast.pdf
    7 adults who stutter (ages 22 to 49) displaying at least 3% stuttered syllables in a reading task and 7 non-stuttering controls (ages 23 to 50) named an object and manually traced a course to produce a fluent sequence. Movement onset was earlier when the first speech unit takes less time to produce.
    Robbins, Mary Rhodes (2005).
    The effect of stuttering and fluency enhancing conditions on a manual movement task
    Thesis (M.A.) -- University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    http://etd.utk.edu/2005/RobbinsMary.pdf
    7 adults who stutter (aged 22-49) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville drew continuous circles on a digital x-y pad under seven conditions: 1) silent, 2) reading alone, 3) reading under choral speech, 4) reading under frequency altered feedback (FAF) shifted up one-half octave, 5) reading under FAF shifted down one-half octave, 6) reading under delayed auditory feedback (DAF) of 100 milliseconds (ms), and 7) reading under DAF of 200ms. Normalized jerk (NJ) and the proportion of stuttered syllables were calculated. 7 age and gender matched non-stuttering participants were also tested. Participants in the stuttering group displayed higher levels of mean NJ than controls in all reading conditions, but not for the silent condition. For the stuttering group, mean NJ measures were lowest in the silent (non-reading task), and showed a 49% increase for the unassisted (solo) reading condition. In terms of stuttering frequency, solo reading, the condition in which NJ measures were the highest, was also the condition which produced the highest mean proportion of stuttered syllables (0.13). During the choral condition, in which stuttering was reduced by 95% to its lowest level (0.01), the NJ measures were reduced by approximately 20%, more than any other reading task. The FAF and DAF conditions resulted in 58-75% decreases in stuttering frequency, and NJ values that were lower than solo reading, but higher than the choral condition. For the control subjects, the mean NJ values remained stable across conditions. In conclusion, for the stuttering group, under conditions in which stuttering frequency was high, NJ measures were high, and under fluency-enhancing conditions which lowered the stuttering frequency, NJ measures also decreased. Stuttering can produce quantifiable dysfluency effects on motor systems beyond the speech motor system and that reductions in overt stuttering are related to reductions in measures of normalized jerk.
    2003

    Teulings, H.L. & Romero, D.H. (2003).
    Submovement analysis in learning cursive handwriting or block print.
    In H.L. Teulings, A.W.A. Van Gemmert (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2003), 2-3 November 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ISBN 0-9746365-0-9. (p. 107-110).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=107
    Pen movements were recorded in 12 healthy adults ages 21 to 44 at NeuroScript during learning of a sequence of vertical down strokes, a zigzag pattern, or a cursive-script pattern. The strokes had to be performed by moving the pen from target to target while visual feedback was offered via a computer monitor. The movement patterns were segmented into up and down strokes. Each stroke was segmented into primary and secondary submovements, i.e., a preprogrammed, ballistic part and a feedback controlled part, respectively. Results show that learning takes place during the course of 16 trials as the stroke duration decreased. Submovement analysis confirmed the usual increase in the relative duration and size of the primary submovement. However, this increase was observed only in the zigzag and the cursive writing patterns, which are continuous patterns, but not in the vertical down strokes, which is a discontinuous movement. This suggests that submovement analysis can be used to show learning effects in multi-stroke, continuous movement patterns. NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorder and Stroke R44 NS38793
    Teulings, H.L. & Van Gemmert, W.A. (2003).
    Goal-directed movements in menu selection in computer-user-interfaces.
    In H.L. Teulings, Van Gemmert, A.W.A. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2003), 2-3 November 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ISBN 0-9746365-0-9. (p. 99-102).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=107
    11 adult university students and teachers (ages 21 to 44 years) performed goal-directed movements towards menu items in a drop-down menu of 16 items and compared the movements with those in a menu list arranged in a 4×4 square. The movements were measured using a normal computer mouse or a pen tablet. Results show that total movement duration and secondary submovement duration follow the expected pattern as a function of target precisions and index of difficulty of the goal-directed movement. Pen movements towards menu items in the square layout menu were faster than towards items in the normal drop down menu. However, mouse movements did not show this advantage. A preliminary explanation is that mouse movements are smaller optimally controlled in the vertical direction while pen movements can be controlled in all directions. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke R44 NS38793
    Romero, D.H., & Teulings, H.L. (2003).
    Submovement analysis in goal-directed movements.
    In H.L. Teulings, Van Gemmert, A.W.A. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2003), 2-3 November 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ISBN 0-9746365-0-9. (p. 103-106).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=107
    8 healthy young adults (mean age 25) with normal or corrected-to-normal vision at NeuroScript performed a fast accurate stroke from a home position to one of 4 targets which could be small or large. Peak acceleration was increased in the wrist extension (45º) and finger flexion (315º) conditions compared to the finger extension (135º) direction. Relative time-to-peak velocity was smaller in the small targets and in the 315º conditions. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke R44 NS38793.
    Adler, C.H., Van Gemmert, A.W.A., Teulings, H.L., Stelmach, G.E. (2003).
    A quantitative analysis of the production of the Archimedes spiral in Parkinson's disease patients and controls.
    In H.L. Teulings, Van Gemmert, A.W.A. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2003), 2-3 November 2003, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ISBN 0-9746365-0-9. (p. 119-122).
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=107
    14 levodopa-treated, non-fluctuating Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (treated PD, ages 58-73, mean 68, Average Hoehn and Yahr score 2.3, mean disease duration of 6 years), 12 de novo, untreated PD patients (de novo PD, ages 42-76, mean 69, while the de novo PD patients had the same Hoehn and Yahr score of 2.3, but a disease duration of 2 years), and 14 healthy elderly individuals (ages 52-80, mean 70) of the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale performed Archimedes spirals on a pen tablet. The Archimedes spiral is used by neurologists to monitor disease progression. Results showed that the spiral drawing task on a pen tablet can distinguish between PD patients and elderly controls, and between treated PD and untreated de novo patients. The pen tablet could play an essential role monitoring disease progression and medication responsiveness. Mayo Foundation, NIH National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke R01 NS 33173.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

  6. Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,351

    2006-2008 Movalyzer tests

    2008

    Yan, J.H., Rountree, S., Massman, P., Doody, R.S., Li, H. (2008)
    Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment deteriorate fine movement control
    Journal of Psychiatric Research, 42 (14), p.1203-1212, Oct 2008
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...804e7ebe49dba2
    9 patients with a clinical diagnosis of probable Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 9 amnestic Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects and 10 cognitively normal controls at Department of Kinesiology, California State University at East Bay, Hayward, CA, USA performed four types of movements on a digitizer. Movement time and smoothness were analyzed between the groups and movement patterns. AD and MCI patients demonstrated slower, less smooth, less coordinated, and less consistent movements than their healthy counterparts.
    ADD: Subject ages, funding

    2007

    Harralson, H.H., Teulings, H.L., Farley, B.G.(2007).
    Comparison of Handwriting Kinematics in Movement Disorders and Forgery.
    In Phillips, J.G., Rogers, D., Ogeil, R.P. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 13th Conference of the International Graphonomics Society (IGS2007). 11-14 Nov 2007, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. ISBN 978-0-7326-4003-3. pp. 143-148.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=119
    12 participants (mean age 39) forged handwriting produced by a healthy writer, by a writer with clinically diagnosed essential tremor (ET), and by a writer with clinically diagnosed Parkinson’s disease (PD) (mean age 66) at the University of Arizona. Significant differences exist between experimental subjects’ normal writing and their forgery of three models (healthy, ET, PD) in the movement domain (duration, velocity). Significant differences were found in duration and velocity when comparing subjects’ forgery tasks with each of the models. Frequency spectrum analysis showed smaller components at lower frequencies when performing forgeries in comparison to genuine writings. Findings support kinematic differences between writing by persons with movement disorders and writing by persons forging movement disorders.
    2006

    Caligiuri MP, Teulings HL, Filoteo JV, Song D, Lohr JB. (2006).
    Quantitative measurement of handwriting in the assessment of drug-induced parkinsonism.
    Hum Mov Sci. 2006 Oct;25(4-5):510-22. Epub 2006 May 2.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?Term=16647772
    13 individuals diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) (ages 65-75), 10 individuals meeting DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia (SZ) and having clinically observable drug-induced parkinsonism (ages 40-60), and 12 normal healthy comparison participants (NC) (ages40-65) at the University of California, San Diego. All PD participants were treated with some form of levodopa-replacement therapy. All SZ participants were treated with antipsychotic medications. Results:
    (1) SZ patients with drug-induced EPS and PD participants exhibited impaired movement velocities and velocity scaling;
    (2) performance on the velocity scaling measure distinguished drug-induced EPS from normal with 90% accuracy;
    (3) SZ, but not PD participants displayed abnormalities in movement smoothness;
    (4) there was a positive correlation between age and magnitude of the velocity scaling deficit in PD participants.
    This study demonstrates that kinematic analyses of pen movements is useful in detecting and monitoring subtle changes in motor control related to the adverse effects of psychotropic medications. Department of Veteran Affairs, VISN-22, Mental Illness Research and Clinical Center (MIRECC). NIH National Institute of Mental Health R43 MH073192.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

  7. Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,351

    1995-1998 Arizona State University

    1998

    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1998).
    Elderly subjects are impaired in spatial coordination in fine motor control.
    Acta Psychologica, 100, 25-35.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9844554
    12 Elderly and 8 young control subjects at Motor Control Laboratory, Arizona State University, Tempe performed back-and-forth handwriting movements in 4 orientations requiring varying coordination demands. Elderly subjects showed higher normalized jerk and straightness scores than the young subjects. Jerk scores were independent of the coordination demands in either group. In contrast, the straightness scores were highly dependent on stroke orientation for the elderly, but they remained constant across orientations for the young controls. The orientation-dependent straightness scores in the elderly may result from unequal timing or improper scaling of muscle forces or deteriorating spatial coordination of finger and wrist movements, but not accelerative force control. AG-14676, NINDS 33173, and the RS Flinn Foundation.
    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Poluha, P., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1998).
    Neural dynamics of short and medium-term motor control effects of levodopa therapy in Parkinson's disease.
    Journal of artificial intelligence in medicine, 13, 57-79.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9654379
    Data from 10 Parkinson’s disease tested at the VA Medical Center Minneapolis were used to emulate a neural network model of movement control in normal and Parkinson’s disease (PD) conditions is proposed to simulate the time-varying dose-response relationship underlying the effects of levodopa on movement amplitude and movement duration in PD patients. NINDS grant R01 NS33173, the Flinn Foundation and the Bryng Bryngelson Fund.
    Poluha, P.C., Teulings, H.L., Brookshire, R.H. (1998).
    Handwriting and speech changes across the levodopa cycle in Parkinson's disease.
    Acta Psychologica, 100, 71-84.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9844557
    10 idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients (age 47 to 85, mean 71, Hoehn and Yahr Rating 2 to 5) from the VA Medical Center Minneapolis were tested. The medication cycles of the participants ranged from 2 to 4 h. Baseline handwriting and speech data were obtained 30 min before the participant's morning drug intake. Handwriting and speech performance was tracked across the medication cycle, starting 30 min after drug intake and ending 30 min before the next medication dose. Results showed that movement duration correlates with the medication cycle but speech measures do not. Bryng Bryngelson Communication Disorders Research Fund, University of Minnesota (first author), and by NIH grant NS33173.
    Van Gemmert, A.W.A., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1998).
    The influence of mental and motor load on handwriting movements in parkinsonian patients.
    Acta Psychologica, 100, 161-175.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9844563

    Van Den Heuvel, C.E., Van Galen, G.P., H.L. Teulings and Van Gemmert, A.W.A. (1998).
    Axial pen force increases with processing demands in handwriting.
    Acta Psychologica, 100, 145-159.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9844562
    OASIS software was used
    11 individuals, aged 19 to 26 participated at the University of Nijmegen. Writing size and slant were measured before the experiments. These parameters were used to compute the target size and slant values, for each individual participant. The target slants were assessed by rotating the individual's writing slant 10° in the counterclockwise direction or 10° in the clockwise direction. The target sizes were computed by multiplying the participant's writing size with 0.75 or 1.25. In Experiment 1, the visual feedback of the writing trace was transformed by
    rotating the slant 26.6° backward (clockwise) or 26.6° forward (counterclockwise), demanding a forward or a backward slanted compensation script, respectively. This transformation changed the writing slant, but did not change the height or width of the writing. In Experiment 2, the visual feedback was transformed by multiplying both the horizontal and vertical components of the letters written with a factor 0.675, demanding an enlarged or a reduced compensation script, respectively.
    1997

    Teulings, H.L., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Stelmach, G.E., and Adler, C.H. (1997).
    Parkinsonism reduces coordination of fingers, wrist, and arm in fine motor control.
    Experimental Neurology, 146, 159-170.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9225749
    Motor Control Laboratory, Arizona State University and Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona
    17Parkinson's disease (PD) patients (ages 42–78, mean 65) and 12 elderly control subjects (ages 53–78, mean 67) performed nine writing patterns. NIH R01 NS 33173-01
    1996

    Helsper, E., Teulings, H.L., Karamat, E., & Stelmach, G.E. (1996).
    Preclinical Parkinson features in optically scanned handwriting.
    In Simner, M., Leedham, G., Thomassen, A. (Eds.). Handwriting and drawing research: Basic and applied issues (pp 241-250). Amsterdam: IOS Press.

    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1996).
    A neural network model of movement production in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease.
    In J.A. Regia, R.S. Berndt, E. Ruppin (Eds.), Neuronal modeling of brain and cognitive disorders (pp. 377-392). Singapore: World Scientific Publishing.

    1995

    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1995).
    A network model of pathological cortical-subcortical interactions in abnormal handwriting.
    Proceedings the 7th International Graphonomics Society Conference (pp. 38-39), London, Ontario, August 1995, ISBN 0-921121-14-8.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=122

    Teulings, H.L., Contreras-Vidal, J.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1995).
    Coordination of fingers, wrist, and arm in Parkinsonian handwriting.
    Proceedings of the 7th International Graphonomics Society Conference, London, Ontario, Canada, August 1995, ISBN 0-921121-14-8.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=122

    Contreras-Vidal, J.L., Teulings, H.L., & Stelmach, G.E. (1995).
    Micrographia in Parkinson's disease.
    Neuroreport, 6, 2089-2092.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8580447

    Helsper, E., & Teulings, H.L. (1995).
    Extracting stroke features from optically scanned handwriting.
    Proceedings of the 7th International Graphonomics Society Conference (pp. 76-77), London, Ontario, Canada, August 1995, ISBN 0-921121-14-8.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=122

    Karamat, E., Teulings, H.L., Helsper, E., & Stelmach, G.E. (1995).
    Handwriting features in preclinical Parkinsonism.
    Proceedings of the 7th International Graphonomics Society Conference (pp. 90-91), London, Ontario, Canada, August 1995, ISBN 0-921121-14-8.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=122

    Gierhart, H.S., & Teulings, H.L. (1995).
    Teaching handwriting in the computer age.
    Proceedings of the 7th International Graphonomics Society Conference (pp. 58-59), London, Ontario, Canada, August 1995, ISBN 0-921121-14-8.
    http://forums.graphonomics.org/showthread.php?t=122
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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